53.342916 -6.269724 <-> 53.344252 -6.269788
Wed Nov 21 19:XX:XX UTC 2012
(ReSounding Dublin 2012)

For organ, secondary acoustic and bi-directional audio stream.

This "reSounding" piece transplants the organ from its home acoustic (LAT 53.342916 LON -6.269724) to a secondary location in the city (LAT 53.344252 LON -6.269788), using a bi-direction live network audio stream a resonant feedback loop between the spaces is created - a literal response to the "reSounding Dublin" theme. more: http://rob.kiben.net/resoundingdublin/
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tech schematic | code repository
Commissioned by http://dublinsoundlab.ie - Supported by Dublin City Council.

Programme Note

53.342916 -6.269724 <-> 53.344252 -6.269788
Wed Nov 21 20:XX:XX UTC 2012 (ReSounding Dublin)

For organ, secondary acoustic and bi-directional audio stream.


Rob Canning (Streaming) / Michael Quinn (Organ)

"... a boy throws stones into the river and now marvels at the circles drawn in the water as an effect in which he gains an intuition of something that is his own doing." [Hegel]

This "reSounding" piece transplants the organ from its home acoustic (LAT 53.342916 LON -6.269724) to a secondary location in the city (LAT 53.344252 LON -6.269788), using a bi-direction live network audio stream, a resonant feedback loop between the spaces is created - a literal response to the ”reSounding Dublin” theme.

Like most, the organ of St.Werburgh's Church was built to for the place in which it resides and to be heard by those subscribed to that institution. Instruments are often transplanted from their context in this age of recorded, mobile music, but here, it is that which is the subject of the music, the dislocation of the church organ from both its function and geography. The music of the organ in its home acoustic is transmitted live to speakers in an outdoor area, where it is captured along with that environment and transmitted back to the speakers in the church; this process repeats in an iterative and accumulative manner.

Figure 1: Technical Schematic of Bi-Directional Stream Set-up.

The network expresses itself through a delay caused by the data travelling and buffering between its nodes. The environment is not appropriated for it potential as material to be composed with; neither the outdoor sound or the church interior are bracketed off from the everyday, but become contiguous to it. It is an exploration of the psychogeoacoustics of the locations, the same way as we may holler in the mountains to hear an echo or clap our hands beneath a bridge, it makes a relationship between two points in the physical world that is perceivable in its completeness in neither space. The music performed on the organ acts only to excite the acoustics of the spaces, to create ripples and observe the consequences. The title of the work makes explicit the intrinsic link between the time and place of its performance as these elements are its most important materials.

Given the opportumity, I will develop this piece further to include more nodes, for example, to have a half a dozen or more different locations around the city all feeding and influencing one another with the cumulative result being heard in a central hub with a pair of speakers representing each location. This is the first step - I am taking the dublinsoundlab at its word and using this opportunity not to compose a fixed work for organ and electronics, but to use its lab to develop some ideas around networked and locative performance that currently interest me.

http://rob.kiben.net